Photo from the trailer set for the movie 'From Ithaca with Love - The Odyssey' Stintino, Sardinia.


A new film 'From Ithaca With Love - The Odyssey' to be shot in Sardinia.


From the producers European Drama Network - Why Sardinia? 
The reasons for choosing to make this film in Sardinia are multiple.

Although this is the story of the Greek Odysseus return to his island home from the Trojan War for most of his journey his adrift in the Mediterranean Sea far from everything he knows. Therefore it makes sense to film in Sardinia with Stintino as the key location particularly as the coastline around Stintino also offers a variety of different setting from the spectacular beaches and blue water to rocks, cliffs and secluded tree lined bays.


Sardinia also has a music tradition that directly links to Ancient Greece and The Odyssey. The pipes played by Luigi Lai are a descendent of the double-pipe auloi, the sounds that is said to have accompanied the devotees of Dionysus in their ecstatic dances.


Sassari is the home of the director Malachi Bogdanov. The producer Simon Woods, spent a number of years visiting Sassari, including submitting a short film to the first Sardinian Film Festival, before living here for six months during the making of The Mandrake Root. The support from local production company Bencast, theatre companies, the Commune, the business and the people of the city made the making of The Mandrake Root a fantastic experience.


Sardinia has a wealth of talent that we can draw on to make this film. It has the infrastructure we need to accommodate an international cast and crew. We also hope to edit both the film and the sound here, working with companies already here.

Importantly Sardinia has a rich and individual culture that makes it a place where you want to spend time.

A modern day movie of Homer's The Odyssey made in Ancient Greek & Latin
Subtitled for the world and distributed free to every school on the planet and made in Sardinia
This is a foreign film in every language subtitled through global crowd sourcing, simultaneously distributed in cinema, online, BluRay & DVD and free to every school and university
Financed by 450 sponsors with a desire to do something extraordinary as creative global citizens by making a donation of £1000 (€1200/$1500) 

Could Sardinians soon be eating Pecorino Fondu, making cuckoo clocks and speaking Swiss? According to the following article (courtesy of The Local) this could be a reality if a certain group of people had their way. There is however one small problem - the Sardinians! They won't let it happen.


Could Sardinia become Switzerland's 27th canton? In a bid to ease Italy's economic woes, a Facebook campaign has been set up to sell the southern Italian island of Sardinia to the Alpine country.

The “Maritime Canton” (“Canton Marittimo”) facebook group has gained more than 3,500 members attracted to the debate of selling Italy’s second-largest island to the wealthy Swiss.

“We are investigating the willpower of Sardinians of allowing Italy to sell Sardinia to Switzerland, to repay part of the public debt and restart the national economy,” the group description reads.

The group’s creators also address some of the key practical issues of switching nationalities after 150 years as part of Italy.

“Us Sardinians therefore become Swiss, without doing military service, have [Swiss] francs instead of the euro, and a local economy aligned as soon as possible with that of the new motherland,” the group says.

While first set up in 2012, the group was reactivated over the weekend as Italy’s newly-appointed prime minister, Matteo Renzi, was sworn into power.

“The time has arrived to reopen negotiations,” according to the group, inviting people to contribute ideas both for and against a breakaway Sardinia.

The fresh campaign comes just days after the Swiss voted to curb immigration from the EU; a restriction which would presumably not apply to the proposed Swiss-Sardinian canton.

While the approach of ditching Italy for a more wealthy neighbour may be new for Sardinia, the concept of succession has been popular in other parts of Italy.

The Northern League (Lega Nord) party gained prominence in the 1990s by calling for independence for the north of Italy, which it saw as propping up the country’s poorer southern regions.

Earlier this month party leader Matteo Salvini renewed calls for autonomy, while backing similar campaigns in Scotland in the UK and Catalonia in Spain.



Water skiing maybe but skiing on snow is something rarely associated with the sun drenched Island of Sardinia. 
However there are no less than four ski resorts on the island offering a moderate skiing experience for less than the main European snow attractions. If you are a beginner or have children this may well be the holiday for you.

The main resort is called Bruncu Spina and is Sardegna’s second highest mountain. It is located in the Gennargentu Mountain Range in the centre of the island and is the only mountain in Sardinia which boasts ski lifts and downhill skiing. At 1828m, however, it is not quite high enough to guarantee secure ski conditions so the number of days per year on which you can actually ski are limited. Bruncu Spina is the northernmost summit of the main Gennargentu ridge which includes all the five highest summits in Sardinia. All are around the same height (1800m) with Punta La Marmora being the highest one.

Here are the main resorts with links to details

Bruncu Spina

Altitude info
1570 m - 1820 m (Difference 250 m)
Slopes
3.3 km
0.4 km
1.9 km
1 km
Ski lifts
1
Lift ticket
€ 15,- (Day ticket main season)
Altitude info
1320 m - 1440 m (Difference 120 m)
Slopes
0.4 km
0.4 km
0 km
0 km
Ski lifts
2
Lift ticket
€ 10,- (Day ticket main season)
Altitude info
1360 m - 1385 m (Difference 25 m)
Slopes
0.1 km
0.1 km
0 km
0 km
Ski lifts
0
Lift ticket
€ 10,- (Day ticket main season)
Altitude info
1460 m - 1550 m (Difference 90 m)
Slopes
0.4 km
0.4 km
0 km
0 km
Ski lifts
1
Lift ticket
€ 10,- (Day ticket main season)
After a successful first event in 2013, Sardinia Pride is back for a second time in the small north western city of Alghero on Saturday 28th June.
The first event attracted around 6,000 people, a number the organizers hailed as a great success for such a small Island.

2013’s event was held in Cagliari, Sardinia’s capital. This year, it will take place in the coastal town known as ‘little Barcelona’, with a program including debates, exhibitions, films, performances, parties and shows. After the parade there will be a show and a concert at the port.

‘So we think now that we have to try to force the politicians to take decisions about our rights and about a real fight against homophobia’ organiser Massimo Mele told Gay Star News.

The organizers of the event want to bring awareness to the existence of the LGBTI (Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex) community in Sardinia with the goal of eventually attaining full equal rights and saying 'NO' to any kind of discrimination and hatred.
The lead-up to Sardinia Pride will begin in May with a series of initiatives which, from
Sassari to Cagliari, will track the route of the Queeresima (a play on words between the Italian term Quaresima, which means Lent, and Queer) in other words the forty days of queer suffering that divide the 17th of May - International Day Against Homophobia - and 28th of June - World Day of LGBTQ Pride.

Though the main topic for 2014’s Pride is ‘sex, sex phobia, homophobia’, many other things will also be discussed, including gay and lesbian families, same-sex parenting, bullying and various forms of training aimed at building a culture of respect and differences.

'We hope we can make the other people think differently about homosexuality, because much of homophobia comes from a lack of experience; not knowing any gay, lesbian or transsexual people, or anything about gay life' says Mele.

‘We are trying to make Sardinian people understand LGBTI people are normal citizens like everyone else and they deserve respect'.

Thanks to Gay Star News